11 - Unleashing the Power of Prevention

November 28, 2017

Organizing for Change Podcast - Episode 11 Show Notes

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

In this episode we feature Dr. J. David Hawkins, Endowed Professor of Prevention Emeritus and Founding Director of the Social Development Research Group. Delivered as a Ted Talk style presentation, this recording was taken with permission at the 2017 Massachusetts Statewide Conference for Substance Use Prevention.

Dr. Hawkins research focuses on understanding and preventing child and adolescent health and behavior problems. He seeks to identify risk and protective factors for health and behavior problems across multiple domains; to understand how these factors interact in the development of healthy behavior and the prevention of problem behaviors. He develops and tests prevention strategies which seek to reduce risk through the enhancement of strengths and protective factors in families, schools, and communities.

He is principal investigator of the Community Youth Development Study, a randomized field experiment involving 24 communities across seven states testing the effectiveness of the Communities That Care prevention system developed by Hawkins and Richard F. Catalano. He has authored numerous articles and several books as well as prevention programs for parents and families, including Guiding Good Choices, Parents Who Care, and Supporting School Success. His prevention work is guided by the social development model, his theory of human behavior.

Welcome to Episode 011 of the Podcast: Unleashing the Power of Prevention

 

Guest: Dr. J David Hawkins, Endowed Professor of Prevention Emeritus and Founding Director of the Social Development Research Group.

Website: https://socialwork.uw.edu/faculty/j-david-hawkins

Slides for presentation: http://edc.adobeconnect.com/p3ai7al0dlx8/?OWASP_CSRFTOKEN=7814175d80d0b9e3718de1b578b36ff27f2993a16a358be150f3aa94de7aae66

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

4 Insights from This Episode:

 

Untested good ideas can make things worse. Dr. Hawkins speaks about prevention efforts of the past, which were untested. These efforts sounded good at the time, but were not effective and some even caused more harm than good. Use good ideas, but test them.

Bonding provides the motivation for youth to live up to the standards. Dr. Hawkins says that street gangs understand bonding better than we do. He speaks about the power of bonding and how this protective factor makes youth more likely to embrace our message.  

 

We can promote healthy development of young people. We have over 70 tested effective preventive programs now to reduce and prevent alcohol and drug addiction. Use the resources and tools that are tested and proven.  

 

We will not solve the opioid epidemic unless we invest seriously in prevention. Dr. Hawkins talks about proven programs that reduce opioid use and how implementing them in our communities will address the opioid epidemic.

Website Resources Dr. Hawkins mentions:

Blueprints Programs: http://blueprintsprograms.com/ (University of Colorado)

Surgeon General's Report: Effective Policies to Prevent Substance Use Disorder: https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/key-findings/prevention-programs

Washington State Institute for Public Policy: (Cost Benefit Analysis of Prevention): http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/BenefitCost?topicId=7

 

Programs Dr. Hawkins mentions:

Botvin LifeSkills: http://lifeskillstraining.com/

Strengthening Families: https://www.extension.iastate.edu/sfp10-14/

Prosper: http://evidencebasedprograms.org/prosper

Communities that Care: https://www.communitiesthatcare.net/

 

If you found this helpful, share this episode with a coalition member, colleague or friend!

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 012

 

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10 - Changing the Landscape of Smoking

October 31, 2017

Organizing for Change Podcast - Episode 10 Show Notes

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

Host, Amanda Decker joins Larissa Swenson of the Greater Boston Tobacco Free Community Partnership Program. For those working with Drug Free Communities funding, this sector fills the role of “Other Organization Working to Reduce Substance Disorder”

Larissa engage stakeholders/organizations to increase community capacity and builds support for local tobacco control policies and regulations.

She also partners with individuals and community coalitions to raise awareness about health issues related to tobacco use and serves as a liaison between the program and the program’s funder, the Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program/Department of Public Health.

 

Welcome to Episode 010 of the Podcast: Changing the Landscape of Smoking

Guest: Larissa Swenson of the Greater Boston Tobacco Free Community Partnership

Website: http://makesmokinghistory.org

Facebook:  https://m.facebook.com/MTFCP/

 

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

3 Insights from This Episode:

  1. Ask Youth What They See. Larissa says when working to reduce you tobacco use, talk to youth and ask them what they see in their community. When making any type of change, asking questions is the best place to start.
  2. Build Partnerships. Look for people and groups who can support what you are looking to do. There are people who have the same goals in mind as you and will want to help.
  3. Support your efforts with data. Do your homework and back your efforts to create change with data. Larissa speaks about collecting data to reduce youth tobacco use and creating strategies around that data.

 

 

Upcoming event: November 16th

Every year, on the third Thursday of November, smokers across the nation take part in the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout event. Encourage someone you know to use the date to make a plan to quit, or plan in advance and then quit smoking that day. By quitting – even for 1 day – smokers will be taking an important step toward a healthier life and reducing their cancer risk.

For more information: https://www.cancer.org/healthy/stay-away-from-tobacco/great-american-smokeout.html

 

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 011

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09 - Empowering Youth

September 26, 2017

Organizing for Change Podcast - Episode 09 Show Notes

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

Host, Amanda Decker joins the youth from the Ashland's Decisions at Every Turn (DAET) Coalition to talk about engaging youth in creating change. If you have questions about how to get more youth involved, what to have them do in your coalition and how to keep them engaged, this is the episode for you.

 

Welcome to Episode 009 of the Podcast: Empowering Youth

Guest: Youth Members of the Ashland Decisions at Every Turn Coalition

The DAET coalition is a community-based group with stakeholders from many organizations throughout Ashland. The group is dedicated to creating a safe and healthy Ashland by working as a community to prevent, reduce, and solve the problems that can lead to youth substance abuse. The coalition was awarded the Drug Free communities grant in 2013.

DAET Website: http://www.ashlanddecisions.org/

DAET Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/ashlanddecisions/

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

3 Insights from This Episode:

  1. Empower your youth. If you are making decisions in your organization, agency or community that affect youth, it is important to have youth involved in the process. Give youth real leadership roles. Empower youth to have real decision making authority. Often adults are hesitant to give youth authority when decision making because they are worried they will not make a great choice for their coalition or agency. This results in tokenism of youth (just having a youth at the table because you are supposed to).
  2. Train your youth. How do you increase the likelihood that youth will make a great choice for their coalition or agency? Train them. The DAET invested funds and time in training youth by sending them to the National Leadership forum put on by CADCA. This training for youth helps them to understand the process of change and breaks things down so the youth were able to put their knowledge to work in helping create their coalition's action plan for the next year. When the DAET youth were trained, they understood what needed to happen in order to create a working plan for their community. It is so important to regularly train your youth. When youth have the good training to make an informed decision, they can be a powerful asset to the coalition.
  3. Support your youth. Youth need to be valued and advocated for. Not every adult will believe youth are capable of working with your organization or coalition to make change. Having adult supporters to make sure the youth voice is heard and valued will make a big impact.

 

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 010

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08 - Community Change and Leadership

August 28, 2017

Organizing for Change Podcast - Episode 8 Show Notes

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

Host, Amanda Decker joins Holly Wehde, the CEO of Trades of Hope to talk about leadership and its importance when creating change.

Welcome to Episode 008 of the Podcast: Community Change and Leadership

 

Guest: Holly Wehde, CEO Trades of Hope

Holly is a visionary, a church planter, pastor’s wife, speaker, and Missional Entrepreneur. Whether it’s helping the hurting, starting Trades of Hope, mentoring leaders or helping marriages and families, her passion is helping people live with passion and purpose.

Trades of Hope helps women in desperate places by selling their fair trade products through the party plan model. This creates a dignified partnership empowering women out of the sex industry, slums and sweatshops and extreme poverty.

Holly talks to us today about creating trades of hope and the importance of leading and bring her company from a start up to five years later employing women all over the world.

Trades of Hope Website: http://www.tradesofhope.com/

Trades of Hope Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Tradesofhope/

Holly Wehde: http://mikeandhollylife.com/

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

3 Insights from This Episode:

  1. Remember why you began. Holly speaks about crunching numbers late into the night and getting an email at 3am that told a story of a person that was deeply impacted by her organization. She says this really reminded her why she was putting in the long hours to make a difference. It is important to remember why you began the work and to communicate change stories to the team of people you are working with.
  2. Don’t be afraid of failure. Failure paves the way to success. If you have a dream, don’t be afraid to fail. Anybody who has ever done something truly great in this world, has failed multiple times.
  3. Be realistic. Sometimes our emotions get too attached to the cause and we make decisions based off emotion that are not the best for the organization. It is important to thoughtfully make decisions that are based on reality and not emotion.

 

Books Holly recommends:

Hustle: The Power to Charge Your Life with Money, Meaning, and Momentum by Neil Patel, Patrick Vlaskovits, Jonas Koffler

Winning with People by John Maxwell

Cool technology Holly is using these days: “Basecamp” https://basecamp.com/

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 009

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07 - Using Data to Advance Your Mission

July 25, 2017

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

Welcome to Episode 007 of the Podcast: Using Data to Advance Your Mission

In this episode you will hear why it is so important to use data to advance your mission.

 

Guests: Lyn Frano & Stephanie Patton - from the OASIS Coalition

 

Bio- Lyn Frano:

Lyn Frano is a Licensed Social Worker with over 27 years of experience working with children, youth, and families. Lyn currently works for the OASIS coalition to coordinate 4 Massachusetts communities to address substance use disorder by using the coalition model. Lyn formerly worked in the Weymouth Health Department and coordinated the efforts of the 5 year federal Drug Free Communities Support Program grant and Mayor Kay’s Opiate Task Force

 

Bio- Stephanie Patton:

Stephanie Patton, MPH is seen as a prevention leader in the state of Massachusetts by her peers. She has been the Prevention Coordinator for Organizing Against Substances in Stoughton (OASIS) in Stoughton, Massachusetts since 2012, but has been involved with OASIS since its inception in 2004. A primary focus of her work has been policy change at the local, regional and state level.  Prior to this role, Stephanie served as the Program Director for the Southeast Center for Healthy Communities, where she provided technical assistance to substance abuse prevention coalitions throughout Southeastern MA. Stephanie brings over 15 years of experience in public health, substance abuse prevention and coalition building.  She has presented nationally on coalition development and other topics and has extensive experience in developing and leading trainings. Stephanie has a Master’s Degree in Public Health from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and a Bachelor’s Degree from Wellesley College.

Host, Amanda Decker joins Steve Wright from R&R Partners to talk about how good communication creates effective change.

 

OASIS Website: http://stoughtonoasis.org/

OASIS on Twitter: @stoughtonoasis

OASIS on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stoughtonoasis/

CADCA Website: www.cadca.org

MassTapp Website and Planning Tools: http://masstapp.edc.org/sapc-planning-tool

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

Insights from This Episode:

Using data ensures you are accurately targeting your approach. Programs and solutions can cause more harm than good if data is not collected to make sure the actual issue is being addressed.

Lyn shares a prevention parable to show how data collection is important in both talking about the issues in the community and coming up with solutions to address the issues.

Qualitative and Quantitative Data: To paint a realistic picture of what is happening in your community, you will need to collect both qualitative and quantitative data.

Collect Quantitative Data: Even if you don’t have funding to complete a survey or hire someone to collect data, your community has data available! Look for groups that are already collecting data such as police, hospitals, schools and encourage data sharing.

Collect Qualitative Data: A great way to start (regardless of funding) is to conduct “key stakeholder interviews” with key members of your community. These conversations will help you find out what is happening in your community.

 

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 008

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06 - Partnering with Law Enforcement

June 27, 2017

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

Host, Amanda Decker has a conversation with Chief Dave Martineau and Deputy Chief Jeffrey Bukunt from the Avon Police Department in Avon MA.

Welcome to Episode 006 of the Podcast: Partnering with Law Enforcement.

Guests: Chief Dave Martineau and Deputy Chief Jeffrey Bukunt from the Avon Police Department in Avon MA

Avon Police Department Website: https://www.avon-ma.gov/police-department

ACES (Avon Coalition for Every Student) Website: www.acesavon.com

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

About this Episode: Building relationships are one of the keys to creating community level change. The Avon coalition (ACES) is located in Avon MA about 20 minutes south of Boston. In 2009, the Youth Risk and Behavior Survey data came back with the report that 47% of Avon High School youth were engaged in underage drinking. As a community Avon decided to mobilize to address this community problem with community solutions. The community formed the ACES coalition and created a strategic plan using data to address multiple issues. As a result of the hard work in the community, eight years later, underage drinking has been significantly reduced down to 18%.

One of the key partners in addressing this issue was and continues to be the Avon Police Department. You will hear in this episode the importance of building relationships both the police with the community (including youth) and the community with the police. As you listen in on our conversation, I hope it will inspire you and give you some ideas as to what change is possible when everyone works together for a common cause.

 

Key Points:

1. Use the facts when you talk to youth about drug use.

Youth can fact check whatever you tell them at a rapid pace. It is important to use accurate facts when speaking about underage drinking and drug use.

2. Police are an ally.

Chief Martineau talks about how sometimes parents will use the police as a scare tactic for their child. “Don’t do xyz or the police will “get” you. This reinforces in a child’s mind that the police are the “bad guys”. Police would rather see themselves as allies to parents. The Chief also talks about how they “can’t arrest their way out of the problem of substance abuse disorder”. Police want to help people get the help they need.

Dept. Chief Bukunt speaks about doing things in the community in a non enforcement manner to continue to build that positive view of the police from the community perspective.

3. Education has to begin early.

Teaching youth good decision making early, is key to educating youth about drugs and alcohol. (Many studies show waiting to speak to youth about drugs and alcohol till middle school is often too late.)

 

**What is carfentanil? http://boston.cbslocal.com/2017/06/07/carfentanil-massachusetts-brockton-quincy/

 

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 007

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05 - The Community Toolbox

May 30, 2017

Organizing for Change Podcast - Show Notes

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

Host, Amanda Decker has a conversation with Doctor Jerry Schultz, Professor at the University of Kansas, and key developer of the Community Tool Box.

 

Welcome to Episode 005 of the Podcast: Using the Community Tool Box to create change.

 

Guest: Jerry Schultz PH.D, Professor at the University of Kansas

 

Professor Jerry Schultz Ph.D Bio Page: https://communityhealth.ku.edu/jerry-schultz-phd

 

Community Toolbox Website: http://ctb.ku.edu/en

 

CADCA Leadership Forum: http://www.cadca.org/events/26th-national-leadership-forum-samhsas-12th-prevention-day

 

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

Bio: 

Dr. Schultz holds a Ph.D. in anthropology and an M.A. in medical anthropology from the University of Kansas. He works primarily with issues involving building capacity of urban neighborhoods to solve local problems, understanding systems change, evaluating community health and development initiatives, and qualitative methodologies. He is part of the Community Tool Box (CTB) development team, a global online resource for community building. His responsibility includes both content and design development for the CTB. Dr. Schultz has co-authored numerous articles on evaluation, empowerment, and community development. He has been a consultant to several foundations, community coalitions, and state agencies.

 

The Community Tool Box:

The Community Tool Box is a free, online resource for those working to build healthier communities and bring about social change. It offers thousands of pages of tips and tools for taking action in communities.

Want to learn about community assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, advocacy, and other aspects of community practice? Then help yourself to over 300 educational modules and other free tools.

Under continuous development since 1994, the Community Tool Box is widely used in teaching, training, and technical support. Currently available in English, Spanish, and Arabic and with millions of user sessions annually, it has reached those working in over 230 countries around the world.

 

WHY THE COMMUNITY TOOL BOX?

The vision behind the Community Tool Box is that people — locally and globally — are better prepared to work together to change conditions that affect their lives. Our mission is to promote community health and development by connecting people, ideas, and resources.

With the belief that people can change their communities for the better, and informed by disciplines including applied behavior analysis, public health, and community psychology, partners at the University of Kansas and collaborating organizations developed the Community Tool Box as a public service.

 

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 006

 

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04 - Communicating Your Message

April 25, 2017

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

Host, Amanda Decker joins Steve Wright from R&R Partners to talk about how good communication creates effective change.

 

Welcome to Episode 004 of the Podcast: Communicating Your Message

Guest: Steve Wright, R&R Partners

 

Steve’s Blog with R&R Partners: http://www.rrpartnersblog.com/author/steve-wright-director-of-strategic-communications/

Parents Empowered Montage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aq0C36EQcdc

Parents Empowered Website: http://parentsempowered.org/

Parents Empowered Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ParentsEmpowered/

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

3 Insights from This Episode:

  1. Research your audience: Steve and his team used research to test and evaluate every part of their campaign. Steve shares an example of how his team used focus groups with both parents and youth to determine what to name their campaign. Too often people put out a message without doing the homework to test their message out to make sure the right audience is being reached with their message and that their message is having the response they are looking for.
  2. You are not alone: There are many people and organizations in your community who would love to partner with you to help share your message. Steve talks about how they were able to involved unlikely partners such as the Waste Removal companies to help spread their message.
  3. Keep your message simple: Don’t pick many messages to send to your community. Really narrow your message down to be as simple as possible. You can’t do everything, so focus on one issue and do what you do...well. One message heard 10 times is more effective than 10 messages heard once.

 

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 005

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03 - The Education Sector and Community Change

March 28, 2017

Organizing for Change Podcast - Show Notes

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

Host, Amanda Decker joins the Paul Zinni, Superintendent of Avon Public Schools to talk about how the education sector can be involved in community change!

 

Welcome to Episode 003 of the Podcast: The Education Sector and Community Change

 

Guest: Paul Zinni, Superintendent of Avon Public Schools

 

Avon Public Schools Website: http://www.avon.k12.ma.us/

 

Organizing for Change Website: https://organizing4change.podbean.com/

 

Organizing for Change Twitter: @organizing4chng

 

3 Insights from This Episode:

1. Invest in Relationships: Investing in relationships allows you to have buy in when creating community change. Change is complex and relationships give you the opportunity to problem solve issues and create solutions beforehand. When people feel like they have a voice, and that voice has been heard, they are more likely buy into the change.

2. Look at the Why: There can be many reasons why a sector is hesitant to join the coalition. It is important to do your homework and find out “the why”, and not make assumptions. Once you have “the why” figured out, it important to give the sectors who have barriers opportunity to talk about their barrier and brainstorm solutions. Don’t jump to the solution before you analyze the problem.

3. Make Small “Asks”: Don’t come in asking for a big commitment such as coming to all of your meetings. Find something small and something specific a sector can do to “get their feet wet”. When they are involved in something that is successful, they will see the benefit and be willing to give more. Seeing the successes will make people want to do more.

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 004

 

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02 - Engaging Youth in Community Change

February 28, 2017

Goal: “to equip coalitions, organizations, and individuals to bring change to their community”

 

Host, Amanda Decker joins the youth from SRSLY Chelsea to talk about how to engage youth in community change!

 

Welcome to Episode 002 of the Podcast: Engaging Youth in Community Change

 

Guests: Abbie Dobos gr. 8, Riley Thorburn gr. 8, Jessie Ligi gr. 12, Allison Hughes gr. 10, Natalie Gofton gr. 10, Ben Schwarz gr. 8, Jessie Kauffman (Coalition Director)

 

Guest Links: SRSLY Chelsea (SRSLY stands for Seriously. This spelling of SRSLY is used when people are texting each other on their cell phones.)

 

SRSLY Website: http://www.srslychelsea.org/

SRSLY on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SRSLYchelsea

SRSLY on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/srslychelsea

 

Links Mentioned:

  1. CADCA www.cadca.org
  2. NYLI (CADCA’s National Youth Leadership Initiative) http://www.cadca.org/nyli

 

What is minecraft? Ben speaks about involving the community in a minecraft server building project. Minecraft is a computer game that enables players to build constructions out of textured cubes in a 3D generated world. This project was Ben’s idea to provide a fun, drug free activity for youth after school.   

 

Words of advice from youth for youth who are interested in joining a coalition:

  • Don’t be afraid to step up. You have a voice and it matters.
  • You don’t have to jump in right away, just show up and see what it is about.
  • Joining a coalition is a way to make your voice heard.
  • If it is something you believe in, do it. You can make a difference.

 

Words of advice from a youth leader to the adults about youth involvement in a coalition:

  • Youth are waiting for you!
  • Give you opportunities to reach for more and to reach their goals.

3 Insights from This Episode:

1.  Fun: Make what you do “fun”. SRSLY ideas to make your meeting “fun” for youth:

  • Bring Food
  • Make it a place where youth will want to invite a friend. Inviting a friend is the most popular way that SRSLY grew their youth base.
  • Play an icebreaker at the beginning
  • Separate into two groups during a meeting so that youth can choose what level of intensity they wish to be involved in. An example would be: planning fun drug free events, or something a little more intense like sorting out data to determine what the issues in your community are.

2.  Start Young: Involve youth BEFORE high school. If you can start at 5th grade, youth will have an easier time getting involved and will most likely continue with the coalition into high school.

3. Be Flexible: Be flexible with youth schedules. You don’t have to have the same youth at the table all of the time. If you can get a core of youth to the table, additional youth can join them when their schedules permit. Don’t guilt a youth for not coming to every meeting.

Next Episode: Subscribe now for free and you won’t miss episode 003

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